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On the left is shown the heavy mat of reinforcing steel embedded in the concrete to strengthen the overhanging lip to which the drum gate hinge anchors were fastened." The pipe shown in the center of the picture is part of the 60 inch drain for...
2014-10-31
Here is shown the reinforcing of the spillway bridge piers between the drum gates. The temperature differential caused by heating of the pier plates for de-icing created a special problem in design of these structures, and also necessitated much...
2014-10-31
A slide of unstable material above the pumping plant threatened to take out the roadway all the way back to the cliff. In 1945-46 the Bureau took a large cut off the cliffs seen in the background, widening the highway and lowering the railroad grade.
2014-10-31
All loose material was removed, and this heavy concrete retaining wall poured from bedrock up to road level, thus preventing any further difficulty with this section of the roadway.
2014-10-31
This is a view looking down into the pumping plant pit. The main dam projects to the right. In the area now occupied by the revolver crane will set the twelve 65,000 horsepower pumps for irrigation. Their 14 foot diameter intake tubes are now...
2014-10-31
These are the pumping plant intake trashrack structures, as seen from the main dam which crosses to the left. The rising waters of the forebay are already a considerable depth in front of them." The wing dam is only 1/50 the size of the main...
2014-10-31
Here the pumping plant wing dam is almost completed. The level area in the foreground was once a high rock spur known as the "Dragon's Tooth". During the summer of 1945 a fault known to exist in the rock west of the pumping plant, and extending...
2014-10-31
These 22 foot diameter openings are the lower portals of the pumping plant tunnels which pass upward thru the cliff and daylight on the irregular hill side. The wedge shaped excavation to the right is the gantry crane recess before it was lined...
2014-10-31
Here jackhammer crews are at work on the upper portals of the pumping plant tunnels. Excavation of rock in these discharge tunnels was bid by CBI at $10.00 per cubic yard. In the gravity plan for irrigating the Columbia Basin there was one place...
2014-10-31
Dams across both ends of the Grand Coulee will form it into a giant reservoir for storing the water pumped from the river.
2014-10-31
From the study of this 1-60 working model of the dam, and a scaled section of the river channel, came much valuable information regarding the action of the water in the spillway bucket, and the washing of material in the river bed directly...
2014-10-31
Knowledge of the action and behavior of water flow over dams can be gained only by the careful study of accurately scaled models such as this. They reveal not only information concerning their prototypes, but furnish data for the design of even...
2014-10-31
By Nov. 15, 1944 excavation of the graving dock area had progressed this far. During the succeeding year excavation plans were enlarged, due to hydraulic studies conducted with model of the river channel, and the right river embankment...
1944-11-15
2014-10-31
As the cutting edge of the graving dock caisson came to rest on higher projecting points of bedrock smaller caissons, consisting of precast concrete rings, were sunk to bedrock around the inside edge of the large caisson. After these were filled...
2014-10-31
In the bottom of the caisson graving dock a concrete floor slab 16 feet thick was poured on a cobble fill. The drain pipe rising in the center leads to the pump sump on the far side.
2014-10-31
This plastic model of the caisson barge was the experimental forerunner of the full-working model. From its study and experiments come not only the information for design data, but knowledge of its behavior in the bucket and plans for operations...
2014-10-31
This is a full-operating model of the floating caisson barge used to repair the spillway bucket. The walls of the work chamber are shaped to fit the contour of the bucket, and are equipped with wide rubber seals. After being floated into...
2014-10-31
This is one of the 84-inch needle valves temporarily installed in the penstocks of the right powerhouse. In the background to the left can be seen the lower end of the penstock liner, to which it will be connected. As of January 01, 1946 the...
2014-10-31
Here is shown the sharp elbow section which served as a transition between the outlet of the needle valve and the turbine draft tube liner. In the background is the needle valve with its air intake collar attached. It was the extremely short...
2014-10-31
Into the bridge spans atop the dam went 7,000 cubic yards of concrete. The live-load stresses due to the H-20 truck-train loadings were increased by an allowance of 30% for dynamic, vibratory and impact effects. In order to withstand the effects...
2014-10-31
The parabolic arches of the dam bridge have a clear span of 135 feet and a rise of 17.25 feet. Each arch barrel varies in thickness from 3 feet at the abutments to 18 inches at the crown, and is 30 feet 2 inches wide." When these arches were...
2014-10-31
Built here on the delta of Fiddle Creek is the model town of Coulee Dam, WA. or "Engineer's Town" and "Government Camp" as it was sometimes called. Its 134 dwellings are neatly patterned in a novel arrangement on an unusual site, nestling beneath...
2014-10-31
First water over Grand Coulee, in June 1940, made this picture of a man-made waterfall, 183 ft. higher than Niagara. Already generating power, the dam will pump water onto 1,200,000 arid acres in the Grand Coulee, 280 ft. above dam at the right.
1940-06-01
2014-10-31
A dam across the Columbia River at Grand Coulee appears to have been first advocated by a Coulee City, Wn. newspaper in 1892, but the idea did not gain popular support until this proposal was published in the Wenatchee World on July 18, 1918. Here...
2014-10-31
Unlabeled Photo of the Columbia River
2014-10-31
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